AAL at Masterpiece: Gregg Baker Asian Art

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A two-fold paper screen painted in ink and colour on a gold ground with white kiku (chrysanthemum) behind a brushwood fence.

Japan 19th Century Edo period

H. 67 ¾ x W. 75 in. (172 x 190.5cm)

Byōbu (wind wall) are Japanese folding screens made from several joined panels, bearing decorative painting and calligraphy, used to separate interiors and enclose private spaces, among other uses. Byōbu were introduced in Japan in the eighth century, when Japanese craftsmen started making their own byōbu, highly influenced by Chinese patterns. Through different Japanese eras, byōbu evolved in structure and design, along with the techniques and materials used.

The chrysanthemum flower has a long-standing history with Japan, it was first introduced in the Nara period (710 – 793 AC.) Throughout the Edo period imports of Western illustrated books was banned, so Japanese artists and designers had to produce work with the flowers that were already located in Japan. Often referred to as ‘kiku’ the chrysanthemum is a sign of longevity and rejuvenation. Following centuries of use in prints, screens and other traditional art forms, the Chrysanthemum was used as the Imperial seal of Japan.

AAL at Masterpiece: Gallery Elena Shchukina

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Katusha Bull – The Dawn (2015)

Pink onyx

44 x 43 x 20 cm (17 1/3 x 17 x 8 in.)

Katusha Bull’s aesthetic is based in formal abstraction, but her technique is grounded in a profound engagement with the technical properties of her material. She works with an unusually wide variety of stone, and with each work she aims to enhance the properties of the individual stone. In fact, many of the stones she works with are not otherwise obtainable in Europe, and are available for Katusha only through her carefully developed and maintained relationships with American suppliers.

Katusha’s work aims to create abstract organic form from stone. This particular sculpture, The Dawn, is the result of Katusha’s longstanding investigation into the play of light through stone. The Dawn is carved from pink alabaster, and the deep semicircular recesses carved in the stone act as for light to pass through. Creating non-perforating recesses required working into a blind space, which is a very time consuming and technically demanding process. The thin membrane of stone that is left within the sculpture acts almost as stained glass, and the diffuse pink light that shines through it evokes the sky at sunrise.

AAL at Masterpiece: Duchange and Riché

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AN EXCEPTIONAL PAIR OF FAMILLE ROSE BOAR’S HEAD TUREENS

QIANLONG PERIOD (1736 – 1795)

39 cm wide – 28 cm high

These “Compagnie des Indes” tureens were inspired by an original Strasbourg faience model made by Paul Hannong, circa 1748 – 1754. Chinese made this model only during 1763 and 1764. The only document where this model’s tureen is mentioned is the Dutch East India Company records. Thanks to it, we know that 25 boar’s head tureens were purchased in 1763 and 19 more in 1764. There is no other boar’s head tureen order. As a matter of fact, the next order (30 heads) has been cancelled in 1764 because the shipping was too risky.

A pair of boar’s head tureens of this size and showing such a high quality work is extremely rare.

Note: There is a similar piece in: “The Copeland Collection – The Peabody Museum of Salem” by W.R Sargent – PL 98, page 202

AAL AT MASTERPIECE: BRANDT ASIAN ART

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Kesi Silk Hanging

China. Kangxi period.

60″ x 29″ – 152cm x 75cm

A blue ground hanging depicting a court official and attendant. The official wearing a bronze dragon robe (qifu) and hat. The attendant in plane robes carrying a peach representing longevity, the facial details painted.

Note: There is a very similar hanging to this illustrated in Tapestry and Embroidery, in the collection of the Museum of Liaoning Province

The term kesi refers to a pictorial silk tapestry. Kesi’s production began the Northern Song dynasty (960-1127 CE) as a method of weaving that allowed for designs that were independent of loom controlled patterning.

AAL AT MASTERPIECE 2015: Albemarle Gallery

Albemarle

Jamil Naqsh – Returning to the Muse II

Oil on canvas

122 x 152 cm (48 x 60 in)

Jamil Naqsh was born in Kairana, Uttar Pradesh in 1938. In a still rapidly expanding art world, Jamil Naqsh holds a key position. He is the best-known contemporary artist from Pakistan, long famous in his own country, and also well established in international auctions.

His work reflects, not just the culture of Pakistan, but also that of the whole of the Indian subcontinent, both Muslim and non-Muslim. In particular, there are many echoes of the imperial Mughal regime that once ruled the whole of India.

Jamil Naqsh demonstrates how an artist with major gifts, coming from this background, has been able to enter into a fruitful relationship with Western Modernism, and thus link himself to what is now a worldwide community of visual artists.

The exhibition entitled The Muse, Messengers & Miniatures will be held at the Albemarle Gallery from 11th June to 11th July 2015.

A newly published book – also titled The Muse, Messengers & Miniatures – with texts by the eminent Art Historian Edward Lucie-Smith, will accompany the exhibition.

Christies Lates: Asian Art

On Tuesday 5th May 2015, Christies South Kensington held an Asian Art focused evening ahead of their forthcoming ‘Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art’ sale on 12th May 2015. The event, which was part of the ‘Christies Lates‘ series, featured talks from Kate Hunt, Head of Christies’ Chinese department, a calligraphy demonstration and workshop by Chinese calligrapher Qu Leilei, as well as traditional live Chinese music from Janet Chao, seen in the video below.

Amongst the most interesting items which will be in the sale are a pair of imperial quality, Copper Red decorated ‘Dragon Bowls,’ seen below. The use of copper red is recognised is one of the most difficult techniques in the ceramic industry, and was hailed as the most luxurious to collect. The use of the 5 clawed dragons show that the work was produced for Emperor Kangxi, of the Qing dynasty (1644-1912.) Kate Hunt described how the bowls were of utmost importance, and were predicted to be a highlight of the auction houses forthcoming sale.

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 A PAIR OF COPPER RED-DECORATED ‘DRAGON BOWLS’ KANGXI SIX-CHARACTER MARKS IN UNDERGLAZE BLUE. ESTIMATE: (£30,000-50,000)

 Another significant highlight of the evening, was the two Republic Period (1912-1949) vases. Produced during a time of experimentation in Chinese ceramics, the works depict a beautiful snow scene, which uses Robin’s egg glaze, bold calligraphy, and intricate mouldings.

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A PAIR OF FAMILLE ROSE JARDINIERES REPUBLIC PERIOD (1912 – 1949) : (ESTIMATE: £12,000 – £18,000)

Other items of particular interest can be seen below:-

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A PAIR OF FAMILLE ROSE VASES AND COVERS. GANGXU SIX-CHARACTER MARKS IN IRON-RED AND OF THE PERIOD. (ESTIMATE: £4,000 – £6,000)

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A COPPER-RED DECORATED BLUE AND WHITE VASE 20TH CENTURY. (ESTIMATE: £800 – £1,200)

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A PAIR OF JAPANESE CLOISONNE ENAMEL CHARGERS. MEIJI PERIOD. LATE 19TH CENTURY. (BUY OR BID: BUY TODAY FOR £5,200)

The auction takes place at Christies South Kensington on May 12th 2015.

June Event: Asian Art in London at Masterpiece London, 25th June – 1st July

ALL ITEMS FOR SALE

Building on last year’s success, Asian Art in London is creating, for the second year running, a Pavilion in June to promote the autumn Asian Art in London (5 – 14 November). This year’s Pavilion will be staged for the first time atMasterpiece London from 25 June – 1 July at South Grounds, The Royal Hospital Chelsea, Chelsea Embankment, near Sloane Square, London SW3 4LW.

The Asian Art in London Pavilion at Masterpiece London will feature a group of Asian Art in London participants (listed below) who will exhibit a selection of the finest antique and contemporary Asian art. This selling exhibition highlights Chinese ceramics and works of art, Japanese lacquer and works of art, Indian and Islamic art and Southeast Asian art.

Please click on the names below to view details of the individual participants and details of the work of art they are exhibiting and offering for sale.  To enquire about a particular item, please contact the participant direct.

We look forward to welcoming you to the Asian Art in London Pavilion.